RHINO FOR WINDOWS
Rhino3d v6 for Windows – Presentation Enhancements

Rhino 6 contains significant improvements and new features relating to presentation and documentation in Rhino3d. In this video, Phil Cook at Simply Rhino looks at View Capture, Snapshots and Make 2D.

View Capture has now been completely overhauled in version 6. Any viewport window and mode can be captured to a file and saved at any size. There is now a preview image that updates as options are changed and there are controls for transparency, line pixel thickness etc. For the Raytraced Mode the View Capture serves as a means of saving out large format raytraced images.

Snapshots bundle together the existing Named Views, Named C Planes and Named Positions commands and add the ability to save the state of Display Mode, Materials, Lighting, Mesh Modifiers (shut-lining, curve piping etc) and Environments. An Animation setting allows Snapshots to smoothly transition from one to the next. A number of Snapshots can be saved and ordered, and the result presented as a full screen slideshow.

Make 2D has been re-written for Rhino v6. The command produces much cleaner results much more quickly. The Options dialog is new and includes an image icon to show the effect of adding or removing features such as tangent edges, hidden lines and, a new feature, silhouette. A progress bar is now included and Make 2D now traces the edges of Meshes.


Rhino3d v6 for Windows / Presentation Enhancements

Another from our video series in which we look at new features and improvements in Rhino3d v6.

In this video, Simply Rhino senior Rhino3d trainer, Phil Cook takes a look at some of the presentation enhancements in Rhino v6.

We find that v6 brings us much better looking display modes and objects are drawn more smoothly. Points and control points are properly anti-aliased and the new display is much easier on the eye.

We take a look at the new display mode called Arctic which is great when you want to present an idea and show the form and shape without involving finishes, materials and textures.

We go on to look at the Pen display, Render display and the significantly improved Materials.


Rhino3d v6 for Windows / Modelling Enhancements – Display Pipeline Improvements

Rhino3d v6 is here and we’re taking a look at the new features and improvements it brings in a series of videos.

In this video Simply Rhino senior trainer Phil Cook takes a specific look at the display pipeline improvements in Rhino v6, concentrating primarily on the speed and GPU integration.

Phil demonstrates a comparison between Rhino v5 and Rhino v6. The model used for the demonstration is around 1.4GB in size and contains a mixture of polysurfaces, surfaces, extrusions and meshes and the render mesh is around 10 million polygons.

Hardware used:
Scan Computers Liquid Cooled 6-core I7 with 12 logical processes running at 3.4 GHz;
PNY Nvidia Quadro P4000 8GB card with 1792 CUDA cores.

Simply Rhino are the most popular Rhino3D reseller in the UK, they offer expert training and support for Rhino and all key Rhino plugins.


Rhino3d Tutorial – From 2D to 3D with Rhino – Coffee pot (3 of 3)

This video series looks at creating production quality surfaces and solids from 2D design intent and focuses on a ceramic coffee pot. In many design disciplines, including the ceramics industry, it’s often the case that much 2D design work is done before being progressed to 3D and this tutorial follows that methodology. The starting point is an existing 2D CAD drawing presented in Adobe Illustrator. We’ll look at bringing the Illustrator artwork directly into Rhino and explaining the key differences between Illustrator’s cubic Bezier curves and Rhino NURBS before moving on to quickly reconstruct some of the major construction curves in Rhino. The emphasis then is on creating high quality surfaces relatively quickly from the minimum of curve input before assembling a watertight solid model suitable for production.

In this third video of the trilogy Phil looks at assembling the model into a watertight solid and makes a quick render using V-Ray Express.


Rhino3d Tutorial – From 2D to 3D with Rhino – Coffee pot (2 of 3)

This video series looks at creating production quality surfaces and solids from 2D design intent and focuses on a ceramic coffee pot. In many design disciplines, including the ceramics industry, it’s often the case that much 2D design work is done before being progressed to 3D and this tutorial follows that methodology. The starting point is an existing 2D CAD drawing presented in Adobe Illustrator. We’ll look at bringing the Illustrator artwork directly into Rhino and explaining the key differences between Illustrator’s cubic Bezier curves and Rhino NURBS before moving on to quickly reconstruct some of the major construction curves in Rhino. The emphasis then is on creating high quality surfaces relatively quickly from the minimum of curve input before assembling a watertight solid model suitable for production.

In this video, the second in the series of three, we look at Creating the Spout ‘A’ Surface; Creating the Lid ‘A’ Surface and how to Create the ‘B’ surfaces manually to allow for varying wall thickness.


Rhino3d Tutorial – From 2D to 3D with Rhino – Coffee pot (1 of 3)

This video looks at creating production quality surfaces and solids from 2D design intent and focuses on a ceramic coffee pot. In many design disciplines, including the ceramics industry, it’s often the case that much 2D design work is done before being progressed to 3D and this tutorial follows that methodology. The starting point is an existing 2D CAD drawing presented in Adobe Illustrator. We’ll look at bringing the Illustrator artwork directly into Rhino and explaining the key differences between Illustrator’s cubic Bezier curves and Rhino NURBS before moving on to quickly reconstruct some of the major construction curves in Rhino. The emphasis then is on creating high quality surfaces relatively quickly from the minimum of curve input before assembling a watertight solid model suitable for production. In this first video in the series of three we specifically look at the following:

Import 2D Illustrator data into Rhino;
Differences between Illustrator cubic Bezier curves and Rhino NURBS curves;
Re-create main construction curves in Rhino;
Build high quality surfaces from minimal curve input;
Main Body Surface and Handle Creation

In the next video we’ll look at Creating the Spout ‘A’ Surface; Creating the Lid ‘A’ Surface and how to Create the ‘B’ surfaces manually to allow for varying wall thickness.


Rendering with KeyShot 6 and Rhino

In this video, Phil Cook from Simply Rhino looks at rendering from Rhino for Windows with KeyShot 6 and the KeyShot for Rhino for Windows ‘live linking’ plug-in.

KeyShot is a popular renderer that allows users to create photorealistic visuals without the steep learning curve associated with some visualisation products.

Using the example of a wristwatch, Phil shows how Rhino geometry can be exported into KeyShot and materials, lighting and reflective environment quickly applied and adjusted. If changes are made to the geometry in Rhino these can be pushed to KeyShot using the ‘live linking’ feature of the Rhino for Windows Plug-In.


Rhino3d Tutorial – Engine Cover 3 of 3

Simply Rhino’s senior trainer, Phil Cook, has created a series of videos examining the creation of a styling model for an engine cover that will ultimately be exported into SolidWorks.

This third and final video in this special trilogy examines interoperability between Rhino and SOLIDWORKS. By making careful use of file referencing it’s possible to have styling data that can be updated in Rhino that drives parametric features inside SOLIDWORKS, thus saving time consuming re-modelling in both programs. If you use Rhino and SOLIDWORKS or you are a Rhino user and have co-workers or customers who use SOLIDWORKS then this video is for you.


Rhino3d Tutorial – Engine Cover 2 of 3

Simply Rhino’s senior trainer, Phil Cook, has created a series of videos examining the creation of a styling model for an engine cover that will ultimately be exported into SolidWorks.

In this video, the second in the series, Phil examines adding local detail to the engine cover model created previously. In modelling the air duct detail there are two main considerations. First, it’s important to create a seamless transition between the main surface and the lead in to the duct and second it’s important to control the edge blends so that they transition between a relatively straightforward corner blend to run out completely into the main engine cover surface. These are both common situations in 3D surface modelling even though the specific context might be different. With the duct detail completed, Phil looks at creating the centre blend to join the two symmetrical engine cover halves before checking that the geometry is optimised for exporting.


Rhino3d Tutorial – Engine Cover 1 of 3

Simply Rhino’s senior trainer, Phil Cook, has created a series of videos examining the creation of a styling model for an engine cover that will ultimately be exported into SolidWorks.

In this first video in the series, we take a quick look at setting out the main construction curves and basic slab surfaces before moving on to look at a less than straightforward corner blend in detail. The corner blend or ball corner is often an area that causes problems for designers and modellers and we look at using some simple tried and tested strategies to overcome this.


Creating A Transitional Surface

In this video, Phil Cook of Simply Rhino looks at creating and controlling a typical transitional surface.

Using the simple example of a vehicle wheel arch, Phil introduces how continuity is expressed and evaluated in Rhino before looking at a number of solutions to producing a controlled smooth transitional surface.


Introduction to Developing and Flattening Surfaces in Rhino3d

In this video, Phil Cook of Simply Rhino looks at flattening and developing curved surfaces in Rhino3d.

Both developable and non-developable (double curvature) surfaces are covered along with techniques to apply 2D curves and 3D objects onto 3D surfaces.

Simply Rhino are the most popular Rhino3D reseller in the UK, they offer expert training and support for Rhino and all key Rhino plugins.